Detntal Filling

 

Medical Dental

The procedure for a dental filling is used to repair minor fractures or decay in the teeth, as a form of restorative dental treatment.

A dental filling can help to even out the surface of the tooth and improve the function of the jaw for biting and chewing.

Many patients with tooth decay also suffer from sensitivity of the teeth due to loss of enamel, which can also be improved

significantly with the placement of a dental filling.

There are several options of materials suitable for a dental filling to fill and seal a cavity, helping to halt any further damage to

the tooth, which might result from decay. For example, the material used for the filling, such as direct composite bonding, porcelain,

glass ionomer, silver amalgam or gold inlays, can vary. The appropriate choice will depend on the specific factors such as where

the cavity is located and the patient’s medical history, aesthetic needs, financial availability and preference.

Follow Up

When the dental filling procedure is complete, it is important for the dentist to spend some time with the patient to discuss how decay can be prevented

from forming underneath or near the filling. These methods will also be useful in preventing decay in other teeth.

Patients should be advised to follow good oral care practices, such as brushing their teeth with fluoride toothpaste twice daily, flossing, and using an

interdental cleaner daily. Fluoride mouth rinses can also be beneficial for patients with a high risk of further decay.

Some patients with a high risk of caries may also benefit from a sealant placed over the molars at the back of the mouth to prevent plaque build-up and decay in the area.

Follow-up appointments are sometimes required to check the progress of the tooth with the filling and for regular professional cleaning

 

Gum Disease
 

 

Gum (periodontal) diseases are treated in a variety of ways depending on the stage of disease, how you may have responded to earlier treatments, and your overall health. After a thorough periodontal evaluation, recommendations for treatment range from non-surgical therapies to surgical procedures. Non-surgical approaches control the growth of bacteria. Surgical procedures restore the tissues surrounding and supporting the teeth.

You can find and treat the problem before it gets serious if you know what to look for. Take note if you notice:

Red, swollen gums: That’s one of the first signs your gums need attention. “Gum diseases typically start with inflammation along the gum line. They may also feel tender or painful and bleed easily when you floss or brush.

Bad breath: Your mouth is a nice, warm, and wet home for millions of bacteria. They feed on plaque, so the more of that you have, the bigger the buffet. “Bacteria release toxins that can irritate the gums and teeth and have a foul smell,

It can also be a symptom of serious gum disease. Your breath usually doesn’t change much if you’ve got gingivitis.

Gums that get smaller: If your teeth look longer than they used to, chances are they’re not growing your gums are shrinking.

Sensitive teeth: If a sip of a cold drink makes you wince, your teeth may be telling you something. That’s a symptom of gum disease that often goes hand in hand with shrinking gums.

Wiggly or shifting teeth: Gum disease can attack the bones that hold your teeth in place, making them loosen or move. Periodontitis is the main cause, and it can even change the way your teeth fit together when you bite. Learn more about the various teeth straightening options for adults.

Typical Features
 

Treatment
 

Non-surgical Treatments for Gum Disease

Treatments for gum disease that don't involve surgery include:

  • Professional dental cleaning. During a typical checkup your dentist or dental hygienist will remove the plaque and tartar (plaque that builds up and hardens on the tooth surface and can only be removed with professional cleaning) from above and below the gum line of all teeth. If you have some signs of gum disease, your dentist may recommend professional dental cleaning more than twice-a-year. Dental cleanings are not a treatment for active gum disease. They are, though, an important preventive measure that can help you stave off its development.

  • Scaling and root planing. This is a deep-cleaning, nonsurgical procedure, done under a local anesthetic, whereby plaque and tartar from above and below the gum line are scraped away (scaling) and rough spots on the tooth root are made smooth (planing). Smoothing the rough spots removes bacteria and provides a clean surface for the gums to reattach to the teeth. Scaling and root planing is done if your dentist or periodontist determines that you have plaque and calculus (hardened plaque, also called tartar) under the gums that needs to be removed.

Surgical Treatments for Gum Disease

Some treatments for gum disease are surgical. Some examples are:

  • Flap surgery/pocket reduction surgery. During this procedure the gums are lifted back and the tartar is removed. In some cases, irregular surfaces of the damaged bone are smoothed to limit areas where disease-causing bacteria can hide. The gums are then placed so that the tissue fits snugly around the tooth. This method reduces the size of the space between the gum and tooth, thereby decreasing the areas where harmful bacteria can grow and decreasing the chance of serious health problems associated with periodontal disease.

  • Bone grafts. This procedure involves using fragments of your own bone, synthetic bone, or donated bone to replace bone destroyed by gum disease. The grafts serve as a platform for the regrowth of bone, which restores stability to teeth. New technology, called tissue engineering, encourages your own body to regenerate bone and tissue at an accelerated rate.

  • Soft tissue grafts. This procedure reinforces thin gums or fills in places where gums have receded. Grafted tissue, most often taken from the roof of the mouth, is stitched in place, adding tissue to the affected area.

  • Guided tissue regeneration. Performed when the bone supporting your teeth has been destroyed, this procedure stimulates bone and gum tissue growth. Done in combination with flap surgery, a small piece of mesh-like fabric is inserted between the bone and gum tissue. This keeps the gum tissue from growing into the area where the bone should be, allowing the bone and connective tissue to regrow to better support the teeth.

  • Bone surgery. Smoothes shallow craters in the bone due to moderate and advanced bone loss. Following flap surgery, the bone around the tooth is reshaped to decrease the craters. This makes it harder for bacteria to collect and grow.

      In some patients, the nonsurgical procedure of scaling and root planing is all that is needed to treat gum diseases. Surgery is needed when the tissue        around the teeth is unhealthy and cannot be repaired with nonsurgical options.

Mouth Ulcer
 

 Ulcer that occurs on the mucous membrane of the oral cavity. Mouth ulcers are very common, occurring in association with many diseases and by many different mechanisms, but usually there is no serious underlying cause. Rarely, a mouth ulcer that does not heal may be a sign of oral cancer. These ulcers may form individually or multiple ulcers may appear at once . Once formed, an ulcer may be maintained by inflammation and/or secondary infection.

Typical Features
 

Certain factors and triggers have been identified. These include:

  • minor mouth injury from dental work, hard brushing, sports injury, or accidental bite

  • toothpastes and mouth rinses that contain sodium lauryl sulfate

  • food sensitivities to acidic foods like strawberries, citrus, and pineapples, and other trigger foods like chocolate and coffee

  • lack of essential vitamins, especially B-12, zinc, folate, and iron

  • allergic response to mouth bacteria

  • dental braces

  • hormonal changes during menstruation

  • emotional stress or lack of sleep

  • bacterial, viral, or fungal infections

Minor

Minor canker sores are small oval or round ulcers that heal within one to two weeks with no scarring.

Major

Major canker sores are larger and deeper than minor ones. They have irregular edges and can take up to six weeks to heal. Major mouth ulcers can result in long-term scarring.

Herpetiform

Herpetiform canker sores are pinpoint size, occur in clusters of 10 to 100, and often affect adults. This type of mouth ulcer has irregular edges and will often heal without scarring within one to two weeks.

You should see a doctor if you develop any of the following:

  • unusually large mouth ulcers

  • new mouth ulcers before the old ones heal

  • sores that persist more than three weeks

  • sores that are painless

  • mouth ulcers that extend to the lips

  • pain that can’t be controlled with over-the-counter or natural medication

  • severe problems eating and drinking

  • high fever or diarrhea whenever the canker sores appear

 

Treatment
 

Treatment is cause-related, but also symptomatic if the underlying cause is unknown or not correctable. It is also important to note that most ulcers will heal completely without any intervention. Treatment can range from simply smoothing or removing a local cause of trauma, to address underlying factors such as dry mouth or substituting a problem medication. Maintaining good oral hygiene and use of an antiseptic mouthwash or spray (e.g. chlorhexidine) can prevent secondary infection and therefore hasten healing. A topical analgesic (e.g. benzydamine mouthwash) may reduce pain. Topical (gels, creams or inhalers) or systemic steroids may be used to reduce inflammation. An antifungal drug may be used to prevent oral candidiasis developing in those who use prolonged steroids. People with mouth ulcers may prefer to avoid hot or spicy foods, which can increase the pain. Self-inflicted ulceration can be difficult to manage, and psychiatric input may be required in some people.  For recurrent ulcers, vitamin B12 has been shown to be effective.

Pediatric Dentistry
 

Pediatric dentists are dedicated to the oral health of children from infancy through the teen years. They have the experience and qualifications to care for a child’s teeth, gums, and mouth throughout the various stages of childhood.

Children begin to get their baby teeth during the first 6 months of life. By age 6 or 7 years, they start to lose their first set of teeth, which eventually are replaced by secondary, permanent teeth. Without proper dental care, children face possible oral decay and disease that can cause a lifetime of pain and complications. Today, early childhood dental caries—an infectious disease—is 5 times more common in children than asthma and 7 times more common than hay fever.

Pediatric dentists provide comprehensive oral health care that includes the following:

  • Infant oral health exams, which include risk assessment for caries in mother and child

  • Preventive dental care including cleaning and fluoride treatments, as well as nutrition and diet recommendations

  • Habit counseling (for example, pacifier use and thumb sucking)

  • Early assessment and treatment for straightening teeth and correcting an improper bite (orthodontics)

  • Repair of tooth cavities or defects

  • Diagnosis of oral conditions associated with diseases such as diabetes, congenital heart defect, asthma, hay fever, and attention deficit/ hyperactivity disorder

  • Management of gum diseases and conditions including ulcers, short frenulae, mucoceles, and pediatric periodontal disease

  • Care for dental injuries (for example, fractured, displaced, or knocked-out teeth)

 

Children are not just small adults. They are not always able to be patient and cooperative during a dental exam. Pediatric dentists know how to examine and treat children in ways that make them comfortable. In addition, pediatric dentists use specially designed equipment in offices that are arranged and decorated with children in mind.

A pediatric dentist offers a wide range of treatment options, as well as expertise and training to care for your child’s teeth, gums, and mouth. When your pediatrician suggests that your child receive a dental exam, you can be assured that a pediatric dentist will provide the best possible care.

Preventive Dentistry
 

Preventive dentistry is dental care that helps maintain good oral health. It’s a combination of regular dental check-ups along with developing good habits like brushing and flossing. Taking care of your teeth starts early in childhood and extends throughout the course of your life. 

Preventive dentistry services may include:

  • Regular oral exams, usually every 6 months

  • Teeth cleaning

  • Routine X-rays

Regular preventive dental exams provide the following benefits to your oral health:

  • Lowers your risk for developing tooth decay, gum disease, and more serious dental problems.

  • Helps promote good oral hygiene habits, such as brushing your teeth at least twice a day and flossing.

  • Early identification of dental problems may help minimize treatment and cost.

  • Enables your dentist to do a full exam of your mouth, jaw, neck, etc. to identify any related problems.

  • Helps reduce dental problems related to some chronic medical conditions. Diabetes, osteoporosis, certain cancers, and eating disorders can all have an effect on dental and oral health. For people with chronic conditions, regular preventive dental care is an important part of whole person health.

 

Root Canal Treatment
 

 

Root canal treatment is designed to eliminate bacteria from the infected root canal, prevent reinfection of the tooth and save the natural tooth. When one
undergoes a root canal, the inflamed or infected pulp is removed and the inside of the tooth is carefully cleaned and disinfected, then filled and sealed.

The crown of the tooth — the part you can see above your gums — can remain intact even if the pulp is dead. Removing injured or infected pulp is the best way to preserve the structure of the tooth.

Common causes of damage to the pulp include:

  • deep decay due to an untreated cavity

  • multiple dental procedures on the same tooth

  • a chip or crack in the tooth

  • an injury to the tooth (you might injure a tooth if you get hit in the mouth; the pulp can still be damaged even if the injury doesn’t crack the tooth)

The most common symptoms of damaged pulp include pain in your tooth, and swelling and a sensation of heat in your gums. Your dentist will examine the painful tooth and take X-rays to confirm the diagnosis. Your dentist may refer you to an endodontist if they think you need a root canal.

 

 

Generally, endodontic treatment and restoration of the natural tooth are less expensive than the alternative of having the tooth extracted. An extracted tooth must be replaced with an implant or bridge to restore chewing function and prevent adjacent teeth from shifting. These procedures tend to cost more than endodontic treatment and appropriate restoration.

Saving the natural tooth with root canal treatment has many advantages:

  • Efficient chewing

  • Normal biting force and sensation

  • Natural appearance

  • Protects other teeth from excessive wear or strain

Typical Features
 

Treatment
 

root canal (2).jpg

Wisdom Teeth Removal
 

 

Wisdom tooth extraction is a surgical procedure to remove one or more wisdom teeth — the four permanent adult teeth located at the back corners of your mouth on the top and bottom.

 

 

They're spotted on X-rays. Most people have them removed for one of these reasons:

  • They’re impacted. Because they're so far back in your mouth, wisdom teeth may not come in normally. They can be trapped in your jawbone or gums, which can be painful.

  • They come in at the wrong angle. They may press against your other teeth.

  • Your mouth isn’t big enough. Your jaw has no room for an extra set of molars.

  • You have cavities or gum disease. You may not be able to reach your wisdom teeth with your toothbrush or dental floss.

 

  Wisdom teeth removal surgery is an outpatient procedure that is typically performed by a dentist or oral surgeon.

  A dentist will recommend this surgery if an exam and X-rays reveal that your wisdom teeth are impacted or may cause dental problems for you in the future. (Not       everyone has wisdom teeth, but most people have one to four.)

 The surgeon will cut into the gums and remove the tooth, either as a whole tooth or in pieces. You’ll be under anesthesia, which could include nitrous oxide           (laughing gas) or intravenous (IV) sedation. Your surgeon will decide which sedation to use based on your comfort level as well as the complexity and number of   extractions required.

 

After Surgery

Everyone responds differently to anesthesia. If you had a local anesthetic and feel alert, you might be able to drive home to begin your recovery. You might even be able to go back to work or do your normal activities. If you had general anesthesia or still feel drowsy, you’ll need someone to drive you home.

Most people have little to no pain after surgery. You'll likely have swelling and mild discomfort for 3 or so days. Your mouth may need a few weeks to completely heal.

Follow your doctor’s instructions for a quicker recovery.

Typical Features
 

Treatment
 

wisdom tooth removal (2).jpg

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